San Jose Steamrollers

A Power Wheelchair Soccer Team

About

The Game

Power Soccer is the first competitive team sport designed and developed specifically for power wheelchair users. Athletes’ disabilities include quadriplegia, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and many others. The game is played in a gymnasium on a regulation basketball court. Two teams of four players attack, defend, and spin-kick a 13-inch soccer ball in a skilled and challenging game similar to able-bodied soccer.

 

The History of the Sport

Power soccer was originally developed in France in the early 1970s. The San Jose Steamrollers were one of the first teams in the U.S., established in the early 1980s.  In 2005, six countries met in Paris, France, to create an international organization and unify the rules for international competition, creating the “Federation International de Powerchair Football Association.” The United States Power Soccer Association (USPSA) followed in 2006. Today, there are over 60 teams throughout the United States.

 

The Team

The Coaches

John Connolly, Head Coach Head Coach
John Connolly
Don 2015-2 Assistant Coach
Don Faria
Jerry Book Assistant Coach
Jerry Book

The Players

#25 Frankie Romero
Frankie is 23 years old and has been playing power soccer since 2002. His primary position is goalkeeper. Prior to being with the Steamrollers, he has played with the Hollister Freewheelers. At the end of his first year playing power soccer he traveled to Mesa, Arizona and won first place in the President’s Cup in the B division with the Freewheelers. Frankie is currently attending Gavilan College and plans to one day transfer to San Jose State University. His motto has always been “Never Give Up”.
#4 Ryan Connolly #00 Ryan Connolly
Ryan is a Freshman at West Valley Community studying commercial music production and digital media. He has been playing power soccer since 2010.Ryan has been voted to every All Conference Cup Team, since he started competing in the National Conference Cups in 2013.  Ryan loves the sport and the friendships he has made with players around the country. His motto is, “Live life.”
#42 Chris Faria
Chris is a graduate student at San Jose State University and works part time for the City of San Jose. He has played with the Steamrollers since 2000 and enjoys his independence on the court. He says, “My life’s purpose is to use my disability as my greatest ability.”
#20 Sid Karnala #24 Sid Karnala
Sid is a student at San Jose State University and started playing power soccer in 2012. Sid says, “Playing a great sport like power soccer increases my confidence level that my disability cannot stop me from pursuing my passions.”
#8 Jenny Mitchell #8 Jenny Mitchell
Jenny is a freelance web developer and a graduate of San Jose State University. She has played with the Steamrollers since 2007 and has held several Board and Committee positions with the United States Power Soccer Association. She says, “Power soccer has changed my life. I want to show others how much it can change their lives too.”
Jairo 20150215 #6 Jairo Solorio
Jairo is currently attending Gavilan College and has been playing power soccer since 1997. He played on the US national team that won the 2007 World Cup in Tokyo. After having to stop playing the sport due to illness in his family, he feels good about being back and is looking forward to helping the power soccer community and our team grow, so other wheelchair athletes can experience the sport.
Omar 2015015 #10 Omar Solorio
Omar is currently attending Gavilan College and has been playing power soccer since 1997. He was part of the US national teams that won the World Cup tournament hosted in Tokyo (2007) and in Paris (2011). He is enjoying playing power soccer and helping the younger players learn the nuances of the game.
#9 Stanley Kuang
Stanley is a junior at the University of California at Berkeley, studying Electrical Engineering. A recent addition to the San Jose Steamrollers roster, Stanley looks forward to bringing the Champions Cup Trophy to his new team. Stanley follows this quote: “You miss all the shots you don’t take”.

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